Office 2007 copy paste question

I’ve had a question about copying and pasting between apps in 2007. Can anyone help?
“In prior versions, I had no issue. I simply cut from Excel and pasted in Word as a picture.

With the 2007 update to Office, when I copy a chart or range of cells from Excel to Word, the pasted picture now contains certain formatting from Excel that it didn’t used to?

In prior versions, I didn’t get the gridlines or comment boxes. Also in prior versions, if Excel had certain cells with colored text, this coloring could be eliminated from the Word picture simply by selecting black/white in Excel’s page setup under print preview.

Have you figured out a way to quickly work around this 2007 issue?”

I don’t currently have a working Office 2007 installation, but I remember copy/paste being one of those areas that got ‘enhanced’.

Doing paste>>copy as picture (I love that logic) did not fix it.

any suggestions welcome

cheers

Simon

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8 Responses to “Office 2007 copy paste question”

  1. Adam Vero Says:

    It’s the copy that is changed / broken as far as I can tell. If I copy from Excel 2003 and paste special > picture in Word 2007 I get the same result as I do paste_specialing into Word 2003.
    Vice versa, if I copy from Excel 2007 and paste special > picture into Word 2003 or 2007 I get gridlines.

    Apart from gridlines and comment “markers” I am not seing any other artefacts here. Certainly not comments themselves.

    Essentially, the copy function seems to have now been taken from the screen rendering rather than the print preview engine – so it ignores things like whether you are printing in black and white, including row and column headings etc. (neither 2003 nor 2007 seems to respond to the page setup options regarding comments. 2003 ignores them completely, 2007 shows red marks).

    So the short answer is there’s no obvious way to “fix” this.

    A few thoughts towards workarounds:
    Once pasted, in Word you can recolour the picture to black and white or to greyscale (Picture Tools\Format > Adjust\Recolor > Black and White). This is not too bad (greayscale much better than posterised B&W) but some things like text in very pale colours can end up looking like an ‘outline’ typeface.

    I would suggest pasting tables of data across as tables rather than as pictures (ie just paste, not paste special).
    A couple of pre-requisites to make this as smooth as possible: Create a table style that you like in Word and make sure it is stored in the template for the document. Set this as the default. So, if you don’t like zebra-stripes you need to make colours for banded rows to be the same (since banded rows always gets turned on by default for a new table).
    Set Word Options > Advanced > Cut,Copy,Paste > Pas

  2. Adam Vero Says:

    It’s the copy that is changed / broken as far as I can tell. If I copy from Excel 2003 and paste special > picture in Word 2007 I get the same result as I do paste_specialing into Word 2003.
    Vice versa, if I copy from Excel 2007 and paste special > picture into Word 2003 or 2007 I get gridlines.

    Apart from gridlines and comment “markers” I am not seing any other artefacts here. Certainly not comments themselves.

    Essentially, the copy function seems to have now been taken from the screen rendering rather than the print preview engine – so it ignores things like whether you are printing in black and white, including row and column headings etc. (neither 2003 nor 2007 seems to respond to the page setup options regarding comments. 2003 ignores them completely, 2007 shows red marks).

    So the short answer is there’s no obvious way to “fix” this. To be fair, most people probably ‘expect’ the paste to look like the screen they copied, rather than what would have been printed, but the comment marks are a bit of an annpyance, shame there’s no option to toggle them off (as far as I can see), as you would in Word for example so you don’t even know they are there.

    A few thoughts towards workarounds:
    Once pasted, in Word you can recolour the picture to black and white or to greyscale (Picture Tools\Format > Adjust\Recolor > Black and White). This is not too bad (greayscale much better than posterised B&W) but some things like text in very pale colours can end up looking like an ‘outline’ typeface.

    I would suggest pasting tables of data across as tables rather than as pictures (ie just paste, not paste special).
    A couple of pre-requisites to make this as smooth as possible: Create a table style that you like in Word and make sure it is stored in the template for the document. Set this as the default. So, if you don’t like zebra-stripes you need to make colours for banded rows to be the same (since banded rows always gets turned on by default for a new table).
    Set Word Options > Advanced > Cut,Copy,Paste > Pasting from other programs > Match destination formatting. This strips all formatting and will therefore match your new default table style.
    On a case-by-case basis you could change your mind after pasting – use the little clipboard prompt at the bottom of the pasted area and switch to “keep formatting” or “paste as picture” as required.

    Alternatives might include having a sheet which replicates the stuff you copy and paste, but with different formatting eg only black and white, no comments, hide gridlines. You could even use the camera function pointing at that region(s) so this becomes a straight copy and paste with no paste special needed at all.

    (sorry about the finger slippage – please delete previous duff comment post)

  3. dougaj4 Says:

    Simon – the paste – as picture – copy as picture dialog box has an option to copy as printed, which pastes in Word without the gridlines and comment markers.

    Thanks for raising this and prompting me to have another look at it by the way; I’ve been setting the grid line colour to white and back again when I needed to copy and paste.

  4. Adam Vero Says:

    Doug, you are right that using copy as picture you can choose to take the printed version instead of the screen version, but this still does not allow the option for a greyscale or black and white rendering in 2007.
    In older versions, it respected the page layout setting to print in black and white and would produce a copied picture which was monochorome, but it no longer does this.

    Copy as picture is several clicks away as well, although you can add it to the Quick Access Toolbar (and it becomes yet another of those mysterious green blobs as it has no specific icon)

  5. dougaj4 Says:

    Adam – well I didn’t say it was good; it’s just not as bad as it could be :)

    Regarding copying as a grey scale, as far as I can see you can’t do that. The simplest option seems to be to paste it and format it to a greyscale. You can either do that in Excel and re-copy and paste, or do it in Word (or Powerpoint).

    Should be possible to do it in VBA I suppose. Now if the macro-recorder worked on graphic objects I’d probably have a go, but since it doesn’t, I won’t.

  6. Patrick O'Beirne Says:

    rg.CopyPicture Appearance:=xlScreen, Size:=xlScreen, Format:=xlPicture

    The workaround is to copy as picture, paste back into Excel as picture, then copy that to the other app.
    I had a post on this on public.excel.charting but for some reason the Search is not finding my post now.

    I had a problem recently in a Mac user viewing PPTs created in Windows from PP 2007 with images from Excel 2007 where the font looked bad. The problem was that the windows metafiles had Charts with the Calibri font – even thought the default workbook font was Arial for Mac compatibility, Calibri must be buried in the Gallery somewhere. The fix there is to create the chart then set .chart.chartarea.font.name=”Arial”.
    chartarea.font does not appear in Intellisense (duh) so it may be one of these deprecated but still functional things like DrawingObjects.

  7. Copy and Paste as Picture « Newton Excel Bach, not (just) an Excel Blog Says:

    […] issue was raised at Smurf on Spreadsheets and has a fairly simple […]

  8. excely Says:

    changing to greyscale in ppt makes the numbers look awful – i can’t believe there is a better solution to this – why did they change this?!!

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