Well done the US

seeing as how we are in full back patting mode…

This is so sensible.

I really object to companies taking normal English language words and trademarking them, its a really petty landgrab mentality.

So I am delighted the judge in the ‘App Store’ saga appears to share the same view. Now they just need to charge back the full cost to the clowns who launched the action and common sense might be encouraged in future. And we get to keep all our words.

youpee

cheers

simon

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7 Responses to “Well done the US”

  1. eferrerod Ferrero Says:

    We object to a company that trademarked the word apple now trying to trademark app store? :)

    It seems to me that this whole field went loony a long time ago…

  2. Simon Says:

    ha ha – good point Ed

  3. dan l Says:

    Totally tangential to the topic:

    I find the abuse of the term ‘app’ to be totally infuriating. A woman I work with refers to full featured software like Outlook or Excel as “apps”.

    I guess it’s short for application, so she’s not ‘wrong’, but I guess it just seems silly to liken mostly single use narrow software for a phone to the full featured stuff you run on your desktop.

  4. David Hager Says:

    Single use narrow software should have never been referred to as apps. They are mini-apps :)

  5. Marcus from London Says:

    Most of the big firms have tried it. I recall (and managed to find) a case where Microsoft threatened litigation on a company producing Jewish texts as the product had the word ‘bookshelf’ in it.

    http://articles.nydailynews.com/1995-03-19/local/17968978_1_microsoft-spokesman-greg-shaw-microsoft-attorney-microsoft-bookshelf

    MS have always been quite adroit as using industry standard or generic terms in their app names. Word, ‘SQL’ Server.

  6. Dorothy Says:

    It’s not just companies -what about the state of Kentucky patenting the word Kentucky. So now you have KFC and Neil Diamond can’t sing Kentucky Rain without paying them a royalty.
    Too much greed. It’s different if you “invent a word” to describe your product then get a trademark, but common words that have been in use for over a year should not be allowed to become the “property” of anyone.

  7. excelandaccess Says:

    Great post. It can be pretty upsetting. Not much the little man can do except pay pay pay

    Excel Consultants

    Christopher

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